Loss of sexual desire is common in women who are about to reach menopause or those who are already there. During this time, there is a lot usually going on and thus leading to hormonal changes. Hormonal changes have various effects, ranging from a spontaneous desire to plummet. While hormones are the primary cause, blaming it all on hormones is unfair. At this moment, it is important for both partners to learn how to keep the sex drive going on. Here are tips on causes of loss of libido and how to correct it.


At some point in life, many women are deep into career, marriage, caregiving or raising children. All these activities can lead to building up of tension which is not healthy for your sexual life. At such a point, a relationship becomes of least importance and sex is no longer thought of.

How to deal with it: Arrange dates for lovemaking even if you have never had to do this. Pay less attention to sex and focus more on spending time together for oral, foreplay and massage. You may also want to get couples therapy if your relationship is not on the right track.


Desire tends to reduce as one grows older. Two-thirds of women experience this problem. Partly, it can be blamed on reduced testosterone-the active hormone in every phase of sex response, beginning with desire.

How to deal with it: While there is no FDA approves testosterone treatment, some doctors prescribe creams off-label for some women. Kegels exercises and abstaining from smoking also helps improve sexual health.

Mood disorders and medication

Anxiety and depression can lead to sexual problems. Women experience more mood disorders at the ages of about 40-60. Vital treatments for depression and antidepressant drugs can also reduce sexual response. Though the meds reduce depression symptoms, the desire may tank.

How to deal with it: Talk to your doctor about your low desire. Some antidepressant drugs such as non –SSRI pills have fewer sexual side effects.

Dryness, pain and other hormonal issues

After menopause, a woman does not experience the revved up days in her cycle. Less estrogen implies less blood flow to the vagina and consequently, dryness. So, during sex, it hurts and eventually, one craves less of it.

How to deal with it: First things first, remove the pain. You can do this by trying silicone based or water based lubricants to reduce friction. Also, you can ask the doctor about low-done estrogen in a ring/cream or vaginal moisturizers. You can also try hormonal therapy. Though it will not bring back the drive, it will rid of night sweats, hot flashes or other factors that make you feel like you are not sexy. Having sex more often tends to promote blood flow and reducing dryness too.

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